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Thread: Chinese Triads

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    Chinese Triads

    overall thread for the topic.


    Background:
     
    Triad refers to the many branches of Chinese transnational organized crime organizations based in Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan and also in countries with significant Chinese populations, such as the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.


    Etymology

    The term "Triad" was assumed to be coined by British authorities in colonial Hong Kong, as a reference to the triads' use of triangular imagery.[1] While never proven, it is "highly probable" that triad organizations either took after or were originally part of the revolutionary movement called the White Lotus Society.[2]


    History

    17th Century

    In 1644, the Battle of Shanhai Pass placed the Qing Dynasty into power of mainland China upon defeating the Ming Dynasty. The ruling Qings were afraid of the Shaolin Monks and ordered them to be destroyed under Shunzhi Emperor. The Shaolin Monks fled and marked the beginning of Chinese secret societies.[3] However, only Five Shaolin Monks survived and escaped seeking refuge in the Sacred Mountains of China. The five monks were referred to as The Triad Five Elders and founded the martial art known as Ng Jo Kuen.[4] The Tiandihui were believed to derive from Ming Dynasty loyalists and these Shaolin monks.


    18th Century
    Main article: Heaven and Earth Society

    In the 1760s, the Heaven and Earth Society (天地會), a fraternal organization was founded, and as the society's influence spread throughout China, it branched into several smaller groups with different names, one of which was the Three Harmonies Society (三合會). These societies adopted the triangle as their emblem, usually accompanied by decorative images of swords or portraits of Guan Yu. Their aim was to overthrow the Qing Dynasty and restore Ming Dynasty.


    19th Century

    In British Hong Kong, there was a strong intolerance for secret societies. While being unaware of their previous issues the British considered the Tiandihui a criminal threat. The Tiandihui were charged and imprisoned in Hong Kong which was under British law at that time.

    During the 1800s, many such societies were seen as legitimate ways of helping new immigrants from China settle into a new country. Secret societies were officially banned by the British government in Singapore during the 1890s and slowly stamped out by successive colonial governors and leaders over time.[5] The opium trade, prostitution and brothels were also banned. Immigrants were encouraged to seek help from a local kongsi instead of turning to secret societies, which also contributed to their decline. After World War II, these societies saw a resurgence as gangsters took advantage of the uncertainty and growing anti-British sentiment. Certain Chinese communities, such as some "new villages" of Kuala Lumpur and Bukit Ho Swee in Singapore became notorious for gang violence.


    20th Century

    When the Chinese Communist Party came to power in 1949 in mainland China, law enforcement became stricter and tough governmental crackdown on criminal organizations forced the triads to migrate to Hong Kong, then a British colony. It was estimated that in the 1950s, there were about 300,000 triad members in Hong Kong.[6] Academics at the University of Hong Kong say that most triad societies were established between 1914 and 1939, and that there were once more than 300 in the territory. Since then the number of such groups has consolidated to around 50, of which 14 are still regularly in the eye of police.[7] By 1951, there were nine main triads operating in Hong Kong and they had divided the land according to their ethnic groups and geographical locations, with each triad in charge of a region. The nine triads were Wo Hop To, Wo Shing Wo, Rung, Tung, Chuen, Shing, Sun Yee On, 14K and Luen. Each of them had their own headquarters, sub-societies and public fronts. After the 1956 riots, the Hong Kong government introduced stricter law enforcement and the triads became less active.


    Criminal activities

    Triads currently engage in a variety of crimes from extortion and money laundering to trafficking and prostitution. They also are involved in smuggling and counterfeiting goods such as music, video, and software as well as more tangible goods such as clothes, watches, and money.[8]

    Counterfeiting

    Triads have been engaging in counterfeiting since the 1880s. Between the 1960s and 1970s, triads were involved in counterfeiting Chinese currency, often of the Hong Kong 50-cent piece. In the same decade, the gangs were also involved in copying books, usually expensive ones, and selling them in the black market. With the advent of new technology and the improvement of the average person's standard of living, triads have progressed to producing counterfeit goods such as watches, film VCDs / DVDs and designer apparel such as clothing and handbags.[9] Since the 1970s, triad turf control was weakened and some triads shifted their revenue streams to underground as well as legitimate businesses.[7]

    Health care fraud

    In Japan, four triad members were found conducting operations regarding health care fraud and arrested.[10]


    Structure and composition

    Traditional triad organizational structure.

    Triads use numeric codes to distinguish between ranks and positions within the gang; the numbers are inspired by Chinese numerology based on the I Ching.[11] "489" refers to the "Mountain" or "Dragon" Master (or 'Dragon Head'), while 438 is used for the "Deputy Mountain Master", a "432" indicates "Grass Slipper" rank[3] and the Mountain Master's proxy, "Incense Master", who oversees inductions into the Triad, and "Vanguard", who assists the Incense Master. "426" refers to a "military commander", also known as a "Red Pole", overseeing defensive and offensive operations, while "49" denotes the position of "soldier" or rank-and-file member. The "White Paper Fan" (415) provides financial and business advice, and the "Straw Sandal" (432) functions as a liaison between different units.[12][13] "25" refers to an undercover law enforcement agent or spy from another triad, and has become popularly used in Hong Kong as a slang for "informant".[citation needed] "Blue Lanterns" are uninitiated members, equivalent to Mafia associates and, as such, do not have a number designation.


    Rituals and codes of conduct

    Initiation

    Similar to the Italian mafia or the Japanese yakuza, Triad members tend to be subject to initiation ceremonies.[14] A typical ceremony takes place at an altar dedicated to Guan Yu, with incense and an animal sacrifice, usually a chicken, pig or goat. After drinking a mixture of wine and blood of the animal or the candidate, the member will pass beneath an arch of swords while reciting the triad's oaths. The paper on which the oaths are written will be burnt on the altar to confirm the member's obligation to perform his duties to the gods. Three fingers on the left hand will be raised as a binding gesture.[15]

    36 Oaths

    The Triad initiate is required to adhere to "the 36 oaths."


    Current Clans

    Tongs
    See also: Tong (organization)

    Tongs are similar to triads except that they originated among early immigrant Chinatown communities independently, rather than as extensions of modern triads. The word literally means "social club," and Tongs are not specifically underground organizations. The first Tongs formed in the second half of the 19th century among the more marginalized members of early immigrant Chinese American communities for mutual support and protection from nativists. These Tongs modeled themselves on triads, but they were established without clear political motives, yet they become involved in criminal activities such as extortion, illegal gambling, drug trafficking, human trafficking, murder and prostitution.[16][17] In recent years, some Tongs have reformed to eliminate their criminal elements and have become civic-minded organizations.[citation needed]

    Southeast
    See also: Secret societies in Singapore

    Triad activities were also present in Chinese communities around Southeast Asia. When Malaysia and Singapore, which have the region's largest population of ethnic Chinese, first became Crown Colonies, secret societies and triads were much more common and controlled the local communities similar to the way the Sicilian Mafia did through extortion of "protection money" and illegal money lending. Many conducted blood rituals such as drinking one another's blood as a sign of brotherhood, while others engaged in running opium dens and brothels.

    Remnants of these former gangs and societies still exist. Due to the efforts of the government in both countries to reduce crime, such societies have largely faded away from the public eye, especially in Singapore.

    International activities

    Triads are also active in other regions with significant overseas Chinese populations, apart from the Chinese mainland, Macau, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Triads are known to be operating in countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy and Argentina. They are often involved in helping immigrants enter countries illegally. Shanty & Mishra (2007) estimate that annual profits from narcotics is $200 billion; revenues from human trafficking into Europe and the United States are believed to amount to $3.5 billion per year.[18]


    Triad countermeasures

    Law enforcement means

    The Organized Crime and Triad Bureau (OCTB) is a division within the Hong Kong Police Force that is responsible for triad countermeasures. The OCTB and Criminal Intelligence Bureau work together with the Narcotics Bureau and Commercial Crime Bureau to process data and information collected by their operation units to counter triad leaders. Other departments involved in countering triad activities include Customs and Excise Department, Immigration Department and ICAC. They cooperate with the police to impede triads' expansions and other organized gangs.[19] Police actions regularly target organised crime, including raids on entertaining establishments under control of triads, and the placing of operatives deep undercover[7] – this was the central theme to the Infernal Affairs trilogy.

    Canada

    The Guns and Gangs Unit of the Toronto Police Service is a specialized command detective unit that is responsible for handling triads. Formerly the Asian Gang Unit of the Metro Toronto Police was responsible for dealing with triad related matters, but a larger unit was created to deal with the broader array of ethnic gangs in the city.

    At the national (and in some cases provincial) level, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's Organized Crime Branch is responsible for investigating all gang related activities including triads. The Canada Border Services Agency Organized Crime units works with the RCMP to detain and remove non-Canadian triad members.

    Legislative measures

    Primary laws in addressing the triad problem are the Societies Ordinance and the Organized & Serious Crimes Ordinance. The former was enacted in 1949 to outlaw triads in Hong Kong. It stipulates that any person convicted of professing or claiming to be an office bearer or managing or assisting in the management of a triad can be fined up to HK$1 million and a prison term of up to 15 years.[7]

    Since the 1970s, the power of triads has further diminished due to the establishment of the Independent Commission Against Corruption in 1974. The agency targeted brazen corruption within police ranks linked with triads.[7] Being a member of a triad is already an offence punishable by fines ranging from HK$100,000 to HK$250,000 and three to seven years imprisonment under an ordinance enacted in Hong Kong in 1994,[7] and aims to provide the police with special investigative powers, to provide heavier penalties for organized crime activities and to authorize the courts to confiscate the proceeds of such crimes.

    Canada

    The Organized Crime and Law Enforcement Act was created to deal with organized crime and gives a tool for police forces in Canada to handle organized criminal activities. This Act enhances the general role of the Criminal Code of Canada (with amendments to deal with organized crime) in dealing with triad criminal activities.



    relevant links from old threads:
    Triads tighten grip on Russia's far east
    Living on the mean streets [Problem With HK Triads]
    Notorious Macau gangster Wan Kuok-koi( Broken Tooth) released from prison
    Gang war fears see Macau police detain 150, Hong Kong arrest 130

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    well...exploiting others isnt any better. pride or shame is up to individual interpretation. my thread hints to neither. i just like to put several threads of the same topic under one overall thread. kind of a habit of mine.

    more to the point though, id agree with you generally. although things are never black and white. there is a reason Hong Kong is not like Detroit (or Mexico for that matter), and it isnt because the HK police (as good as they are) have done anything meaningful in eliminating Triads. the vast majority of the HK prostitutes are illegally trafficked, not local. for example, the ones servicing whites and foreigners in Wan Chai are from SEA.

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  3. #3
    triad is still active in hk? i heard they are more active in the 80s and 90s. 90s is really a golden age or something.

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    you were in the thread that answers this question. the crackdowns (along with high prices) pushed them to expand (diversify) further, but it didnt actually lessen Triad violence in HK. also planning, meetings and recruitment rituals are still done in Hong Kong.

    http://www.eastbound88.com/showthrea...With-HK-Triads
    http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/hkediti...t_16067137.htm

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    A lot of politician were related to those mafia, including Sun Yat-sen孙逸仙,Chiang Kai Shek蒋介石, Qiu Jin秋瑾, Xu Xilin徐锡麟, Zhu De 朱德 and so on.
    Those mafia played an important role in modern times.
    Using a famous chinese poem to describe this "仗义每多屠狗辈,负心多是读书人“
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    Coolest gang ever!!Wonder what its like in real life.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oolong View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Coolest gang ever!!Wonder what its like in real life.
    [probably NSFW]






    naw mostly you just see low level guys. it is as you would expect when you have a bunch of teen delinquents running around. loud, arrogant, sloppy...you can go to appleactionnews and look up 14K, Sun Yee On, etc. and watch them tumble over each other in brawls if you want.

    which reminds me. in Sleeping Dogs, 18k and Sun On Yee are based on those triads in HK. if it wasnt obvious.

    anyway, onto the real stuff.



    Quote Quote
    Shenzhen, HK cops bust triad banquet
    04-02-2013 10:12 BJT
     
    A massive police raid on a Shenzhen restaurant has resulted in the detention of 160 members of a Hong Kong triad who were attending a celebration that was disguised as a wedding, local police announced on Friday.


    Wearing bullet-proof vests and helmets and carrying submachine guns, local police raided
    the restaurant on March 28th, 2013

    Some 350 police officers surrounded the restaurant near the Futian checkpoint station to Hong Kong Thursday night.

    Wearing bullet-proof vests and helmets and carrying submachine guns, local police raided the restaurant while other police in riot gear locked down the street, according to photos released by local police.

    Shenzhen police said over the weekend they detained members of Hong Kong's biggest organized crime syndicate called the Wo Shing Wo, adding that they have been closely monitoring the activity of the gang members in Shenzhen.

    An officer with the public affairs office of the Shenzhen public security bureau declined to comment on the campaign when reached by the Global Times Sunday.

    The Hong Kong-based Sing Tao Daily reported that the gang members were attending a banquet to honor a new triad leader. Shenzhen was chosen as an alternative to Hong Kong, amid severe police crackdowns in the special administrative region.


    Wearing bullet-proof vests and helmets and carrying submachine guns, local police raided
    the restaurant on March 28th, 2013 (Photo/ Chinanews.com)

    Hong Kong police also sent more than 10 officers to assist in the operation, the newspaper reported.

    China National Radio reported Saturday that the police operation attracted some onlookers, who said they saw the detainees being taken away at around midnight.

    Wo Shing Wo is said to have some 200,000 members but has been in decline for more than a decade.

    China National Radio reported Saturday that the gang's fortunes appeared to be on the rise again after becoming involved in pirated CDs and the drug trade.

    In a separate crackdown also on Thursday, Hong Kong police detained 63 suspected gang members in a raid that was the culmination of a nine-month undercover operation named "High Scorer."

    The undercover agent gathered evidence against more than 80 triad members, the Hong Kong-based Wen Wei Po reported.


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  8. #8
    who is the biggest triad right now?

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    conventional knowledge is that member wise, Sun Yee On has the most members. around 50k or something. but its peers also have tens of thousands of members so it isnt a very relevant statistic. the large membership doesnt necessarily mean more prevalent.

    for example, the OP has an article on Broken Tooth Koi, hes 14K not Sun Yee On. the article i just posted of the banquet bust wasnt Sun Yee On either, it was Wo Shing Wo, which that article said to be the largest. but i think they arrived at 200,000 by combining other gangs.

    in the end, membership statistics are unlikely to be accurate and also isnt very relevant. a meaningful comparison would be where and what they operate.

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    Undercover against Sun Yee On
    Quote Quote
    Law started chatting with him, then suddenly turned fierce and banged the table.

    'I have long suspected you of working undercover,' he said.

    'If one day we find you are an undercover agent, our brothers will chop you to death.'
    Quote Quote
    Triad undercover officer almost blew his cover
    Simpson Cheung
    Wednesday, 15 August, 2012, 5:19am
     
    A police undercover agent was almost exposed while being threatened by a triad leader, a court was told yesterday before 10 of 19 defendants were convicted of acting or claiming to be members of the notorious Sun Yee On gang.

    They were arrested after paying tribute to faction leader Lee Tai-lung, also known as the Baron of Tsim Sha Tsui East, at a religious ritual in Kowloon City on August 27, 2010. Lee was chopped to death outside the Shangri-La hotel in East Tsim Sha Tsui by rival triad Wo Shing Wo in 2009.

    The court heard that police constable 'Ah Wang' was implanted into the Sun Yee On in November 2008 and worked as a waiter in various pubs and a hot pot restaurant during his two years undercover.

    One day in November 2010 he was tested by faction leader Law Ka-fai. Law, 37, was playing poker in a Tsim Sha Tsui pub with two friends when 'Ah Wang' entered to clean up. Law started chatting with him, then suddenly turned fierce and banged the table.

    'I have long suspected you of working undercover,' he said.

    'If one day we find you are an undercover agent, our brothers will chop you to death.'

    Law then asked 'Ah Wang' to tell him the phone number of people to whom he had sold drugs, to prove he had done the deals.

    Stunned, 'Ah Wang' told Law the numbers were not in the phone he was using. Law said he was strange and told him he was sacking him.

    The next day, Law pacified 'Ah Wang', saying he had been very drunk the night before and asked him to stay on.

    By this time 'Ah Wang' had already collected useful evidence against the members.

    Around midnight on the morning of the ritual, 'Ah Wang' brought bottles of water to a room where senior Sun Yee On member Lam Sai-hop, 56, was addressing members.

    'Tomorrow we are paying tribute to the dead 'good brothers' of Old Sun [nickname of Sun Yee On] in Kowloon City. How many of you are coming?' he asked.

    The next day, Lam saw 'Ah Wang' arranging the ritual in a shelter in a playground in Kowloon City. The shelter was set up next to a stage to celebrate the Hungry Ghost Festival.

    Lam rounded up more than 50 fellow members and repeatedly warned them to be careful not to alert police.

    A police triad expert earlier testified that although the altar had no distinctive triad characteristic, the disciplined way the gang acted during the ritual gave the game away.

    'Ah Wang' recorded all the conversations and activities in a logbook, which was later used as evidence.

    Magistrate Johnny Chan Jong-herng believed the undercover agent was an honest and reliable witness, and convicted Law and Lam of two counts of acting as and claiming to be triad members. Eight more were convicted of acting as a triad member.

    Among those acquitted was Yau Po-hing, 37, widow of Lee, who brought two of her young children to the ritual. Chan said he could not rule out the possibility that Yau was paying tribute as Lee's widow, rather than a triad member.

    Sentencing was adjourned until Wednesday.


    Undercover against Wo Shing Wo
    Operation "Highscorer" produces list of 80 Triad members and their illegal activities.
    Quote Quote
    Undercover with the Triads: How covert police officer busted Wo Shing Wo gang
    Clifford Lo
    Saturday, 30 March, 2013, 12:23pm
     

    Police New Territories North Region traffic task force. Photo: Dickson Lee/SCMP

    A police agent went undercover as a gangster for nine months to help bust two factions of the Wo Shing Wo triad and arrest 63 people, police said.

    The arrests included 16 secondary school pupils, with the youngest just 13 years old.

    The undercover operation, codenamed "Highscorer", produced a list of 80 triad members with evidence of their illegal activities, Senior Superintendent Au Chin-chau of the New Territories South regional crime unit said yesterday.

    "Police believe the operation has smashed two triad gangs and successfully cracked their illegal activities," he said.

    An initial investigation indicated both factions were active in Kwai Chung and Tsim Sha Tsui, police said. The Kwai Chung gang was understood to have recruited youngsters to push illegal drugs and extend its influence in recent months.

    An undercover policeman infiltrated the gang in June to collect evidence and identify active members.

    At about 11pm on Thursday, more than 100 officers started to raid entertainment venues and residential flats across the city. Police nabbed 43 men and 20 women, aged between 13 and 43. They also seized a small quantity of illegal drugs.

    Among the detainees, 17 people were picked up from a pub in Kwai Chung on Thursday night as they met to discuss retaliatory action against a rival gang.

    "Police received a tip-off that indicated triad members were using the excuse of holding an Easter party to cover up their triad meeting," Au said.

    Officers caught 11 others at a nearby park and cybercafe where they were known to gather. Seven water pipes were seized.

    At the same time, police raided a nightclub and a pub in Tsim Sha Tsui where a man and two women were arrested. The women, who were hostesses at the nightclub, were accused of pushing illegal drugs to their clients.

    The 63 suspects were arrested for offences including claiming to be triad members, recruiting others into triads, criminal damage, criminal intimidation, wounding and possession of offensive weapons, and drug trafficking.



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  11. #11
    who is the BIG boss of these gang. is there a picture of them?

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    Quote Originally Posted by linsanity View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    who is the BIG boss of these gang. is there a picture of them?
    as far as i know, which is minimal, they rotate. each region is more or less autonomous. Broken Tooth would be head of 14K Macau faction, for example.

    so this. instead.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUqJOmtM4Y0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHOzd5dPBKo


    Quote Quote
    Enter the Dragon Head
    Raymond Chow says he's left his gangster days behind to help bring peace to Chinatown's streets. Is he for real?
    By Mary Spicuzza Wednesday, Aug 1 2007




    Quote Quote
    Twice Burned
    A Hong Kong mob's attempted takeover of Chinatown went up in flames when a gang arsonist snitched. Now Peter Chong, the mob's alleged U.S. leader, is in custody and feeling the heat.
    By Matt Isaacs Wednesday, Jun 14 2000



    the two guys i posted are Raymond 'Shrimp Boy' Chow and Peter Chong.

    Quote Quote
    Together, Chow and Chong were rumored to be trying to unite triads under the umbrella of a global empire to be called the Tien Ha Wui, or "Whole Earth Association." As it grew, their Wo Hop To employed a level of sophistication FBI agents have compared to the mafia.
    briefly, the story is Wo Hop To sent a guy (Peter Chong) over to the US to take over and create an overall umbrella organization for Asian gangs. Chow was part of the Hop Sing Boys who were feuding with other gangs like Wah Ching and Joe Boys. Chong recruited Chow as his lieutenant. they eliminated or ran the competition out of town and engaged in criminal activities like loan sharking, arms dealing, heroin and prostitution. in the early 1990's they were busted. Chong skipped to HK, leaving Chow behind. in 2000 HK extradited Chong back to the US where Chow testified against him. full story and much more details can be found in the posted articles.

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    more recently and closer to home, 2 Asian Assassins members were abushed, one died.
    Quote Quote
    Toronto Yorkdale mall killing likely gang-related 'ambush'
    Police allege man shot dead and second victim are 'known members' of street gang
    CBC News
    Posted: Apr 3, 2013 1:14 PM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 3, 2013 10:07 PM ET



    Toronto police released a picture of Michael Nguyen, the 23-year-old man killed in the shooting outside the mall. (Toronto Police Services)
     
    Two known street gang members went shopping before they were ambushed outside an upscale Toronto mall over the Easter weekend, leaving one man dead and another injured, police say.

    Toronto police Det. Rob North told reporters Wednesday that investigators allege the two men who were shot outside the Yorkdale Shopping Centre on Saturday night were both "known members" of a street gang dubbed the "Asian Assassins."

    North said the two men had been shopping before they went outside to a car parked in the Yorkdale parking lot, which is when they were attacked.

    "Even though this is likely a gang incident, there is no suggestion that the two victims returned fire or did anything to provoke this incident at the mall," North said.

    "In my opinion, someone must have known they were at the Yorkdale mall and were waiting outside in the parking lot in ambush for them to return to their motor vehicle."

    Michael Nguyen, the 23-year-old Toronto man who was killed, fled the shooting for a short distance before he collapsed. North said he was shot again by the assailants.

    A post-mortem has determined that Nguyen died of "multiple gunshot wounds," North said.

    The surviving 24-year-old male victim also fled and was shot in the process, but he was rushed to hospital and has survived.

    North did not identify the survivor by name, but said that he had been discharged from hospital.

    The men were shot about an hour before the mall was set to close on Saturday night. Within hours, dozens of police officers were involved in the investigation, which saw investigators combing the parking lot still filled with hundreds of vehicles.

    The incident on the weekend was not the first time a shooting has occurred on the Yorkdale property.

    In April 2009, a security guard was shot while attempting to arrest two robbery suspects. He was wearing a safety vest that police credited with saving his life.

    The Saturday night shooting came almost 10 months after a shooting at the Toronto Eaton Centre left one man dead at the scene, another fatally wounded and five others wounded as well. Police have alleged that the June 2012 shooting in the basement food court involved members of the same street gang — though investigators say the incident was not gang-motivated.

    The presence of the Asian Assassins, also known as the Project Originals, can be found in a downtown Toronto housing complex near Dundas Street West and Spadina Avenue, the CBC's Ivy Cuervo reported.

    "I've seen shootings, I've seen people being stabbed. I've seen a lot going on," one resident said.

    "There's been gangs in and out. There's been prostitution. We've had it all."


    the Asian Assassins are a street gang, and like many Asian street gangs, work for bigger criminal groups like the Triads and do their street work.
    Quote Quote
    'Asian Assassins' not a major crime group, expert says
    CBC News Posted: Apr 4, 2013 8:42 AM ET


    “These ‘Asian Assassins’ aren’t a big crew, have never been,” said Chuttleburgh. “This is not a gang that I would say is on the top 10 of the police blotter.

    Chuttleburgh said groups like the Assassins have connections to more established crime groups, such as the Triads, who recruit them to perform street-level work, including drug distribution.


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    ^OMG,thats the most hilarious information I've learned all day,its like gangs having their own subsidiary companies,how fascinating.

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    Asian drug links reach south with meth deals
    John Carney
    Thursday, 19 July, 2012, 6:56am
     
    Hong Kong triads are working with some of New Zealand's most notorious crime gangs to cash in on the country's growing methamphetamine business.

    Organised crime groups the 14K, Sun Yee On, Water Room, and Big Circle Gang all have a presence in the country and most recently gangsters from Fujian have become prominent. They work with New Zealand's most powerful organised crime groups, the Headhunters and Hells Angels, buying and selling the addictive hyper-stimulant.

    Police in New Zealand say indigenous gangs saw the profits to be made from methamphetamine and realised they needed contacts to buy the drug, or its main ingredient, pseudoephedrine, from a source country like the mainland. Quickly, Asian organised crime groups became crucial players in the drug trade and over time their international links made them the real power brokers.

    'Commodity is power,' Detective Senior Sergeant Chris Cahill, of the Auckland Metro Crime Squad told The New Zealand Herald. 'The Asians have the commodity. So they have control.'

    New Zealand police say Hong Kong's 14K gang is the most powerful Asian crime group in the country. 'The money is on another scale. For police, it's the money in the Asian crime that has stunned us,' Cahill said. 'Young guys driving around in NZ$100,000 (HK$564,000) cars, 18- to 22-year-olds with NZ$20,000 cash in their pockets. An apartment with NZ$1 million in it. That sort of money.'

    The indigenous and incoming criminal groups work together as one network in the best interests of business. 'There's plenty of business to go around. No one is fighting over territory, it's bad for business. Nothing attracts more attention than violent crime,' Cahill said.

    Hong Kong is one of the many Asian ports from which methamphetamine or Contac NT is shipped to New Zealand. Contac NT is an over-the-counter flu medication on the mainland but is a controlled drug in New Zealand, because it contains pseudoephedrine, which can be extracted to make methamphetamine.

    The triads organise the shipments in Hong Kong (or the mainland), often hidden inside large shipping containers, which are freighted to New Zealand. Hundreds of kilograms of meth or Contac NT are smuggled in sacks of cement, and often in tins of paint.

    Last month, New Zealand customs broke up a drug ring that smuggled up to NZ$17 million (HK$97 million) worth of pseudoephedrine, which arrived over 12 months at Auckland International Airport in machine parts imported from Hong Kong.

    A court in the country heard that a company called EJ Trading imported 145kg of machinery parts, with 10kg of drugs hidden inside each part. Records show EJ Trading imported 28 shipments between April last year and April this year. Auckland police allege 320kg of pseudoephedrine was smuggled.

    New Zealand police still have an Asian Crime Unit, but it is used mainly in an intelligence-gathering capacity. It works closely with Auckland Metro Crime and Operations Support and the Organised and Financial Crime Agency NZ squads.

    However, though arrests have been made the bigger players remain free, probably overseas.

    'We're not naive enough to think that we understand the problem,' Cahill said. 'I am sure that there are much bigger players that we will arrest in the future.'

    Neither the Hong Kong police nor the Customs and Excise Department would say whether they were aware of the situation. They would only say that they were working with counterparts to fight trafficking of drugs and precursor chemicals for making drugs.

    'Stringent and timely enforcement actions are taken to interdict drug crime,' a Customs and Excise spokesman said. Despite a belief to the contrary in New Zealand, the spokesman said: 'There is no evidence that the pseudoephedrine concerned was imported from Hong Kong.'

    Gangland connections between Hong Kong and New Zealand's gangs go back almost 20 years.

    In 1996 Ricky Yan Siu-ho was named by New Zealand police as the head of the country's 14K triad group and as a co-conspirator in a plot to kill an anti-triad detective.

    It was claimed by a New Zealand parliamentary select committee that, as 'leader' of the 14K, Yan conspired to kill Wellington Asian Crime Unit Sergeant Api Fiso with leaders of New Zealand's infamous Mongrel Mob. He was arrested but never charged with any offence.

    New Zealand police believe a notorious 14K boss known as 'Nine-Finger Wah' is involved in drug operations there. He has been on the run since he was charged with five other men in connection with the murder and dismemberment of Lai King-man, 60, nicknamed 'Police Man'.



    Quote Quote
    For police, it's the money in the Asian crime that has stunned us,' Cahill said. 'Young guys driving around in NZ$100,000 (HK$564,000) cars, 18- to 22-year-olds with NZ$20,000 cash in their pockets. An apartment with NZ$1 million in it. That sort of money.'
    14K, Sun Yee On, Water Room (aka. Wo On Lok) and Big Circle Boys (Dai Huen Jai) all have a presence in New Zealand working with their most powerful gangs like Headhunters and Hells Angels. Commodity is power, the Asian gangs have the commidity so they have control. New Zealand Police say 14K is the most powerful Asian crime group in the country. There is enough business to go around, the criminals are working together and not fight over territory or drawing attention through violence.

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  17. #17
    triads put in mad twerk
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    doesnt twerk mean something else


    Quote Quote
    Lai Tong Sang, Canadian Asian Triads Called 'Blight On Society'
    CP | By Dene Moore, The Canadian Press Posted: 02/28/2013 2:28 pm EST | Updated: 02/28/2013 8:21 pm EST
     
    VANCOUVER - The gang war that forced an alleged triad boss to flee Macau for the safety of Vancouver was a fight for control of the lucrative criminal activity tied to casinos, an expert on Asian organized crime testified Thursday at an immigration hearing.

    Det. James Fisher, a former gang expert for the Criminal Intelligence Service of Canada and now a member of British Columbia's joint Counter-Exploitation Unit, said the dispute was playing out on the streets of Macau in 1996, when Lai Tong Sang arrived in Canada with his family.

    "The point of conflict was who would control the VIP rooms and the control of the VIP rooms was important because it would give access to profit through criminal enterprises," Fisher testified.

    According to intelligence from other police forces, Fisher said foreign nationals were offered junkets to the casinos, where they gambled and spent their way into the debt of the gangs, in the form of either cash or favours.

    Police believe on one side of the bloodshed was the Shui Fung, or Water Room gang, headed by Lai. On the other end the Macau branch of 14K, purportedly the second-largest triad in the world, headed by a notorious gangster known as Broken Tooth Koi.

    "My knowledge was that Shui Fung members were involved in violent confrontations with 14K members and were being investigated for offences that ranged from assault to homicide," Fisher said.

    Canada Border Services Agency alleges this is the world inhabited by Lai, and they want him declared inadmissible because of his criminal ties. They're also seeking to have Lai's wife, two daughters and his son declared inadmissible for misrepresentation on immigration applications.

    Lai did not attend the hearings in person, but listened to a Cantonese translator via telephone. His wife, two daughters and son were granted permission to be absent.

    Over three days of hearings, the board adjudicator heard that B.C. police intercepted a phone call concerning a contract hit on Lai, prior to a drive-by shooting at his home in 1997.

    A former Canadian visa officer also testified that police in China claimed Lai contracted hits on three gang rivals — two of which were successful.

    Inside the hearing, Fisher laid out the triad hierarchy and rituals but offered no direct testimony about Lai. Outside the hearing, he was more forthcoming.

    "It's my belief, based on all the information I have — and I'm not substituting my belief for a finding by the adjudictor of the IRB —that Mr. Lai was the head of the Shui Fung triad society in Macau at the time that he came to Canada," Fisher said

    Fisher, the third and final witness called by CBSA lawyers, explained to board adjudicator Geoff Rempel the world of crime groups such as Sun Yee On, the Wo group, 14K, Luen Kun Lok, United Bamboo and the Four Seas.

    Tentacles of groups such as the Lotus Gang, the Big Circle Boys, 14K and Shui-Fung reach into Vancouver and Toronto, he testified.

    "Most of the triads that we have encountered in Canada have an origin in Hong Kong but they operate independently in Canada," Fisher said.

    Peter Chapman, Lai's lawyer, asked Fisher if he was aware of allegations of police corruption in Macau, where much of the information on Lai originates.

    "From my reading, it looks like police corruption is a serious problem in Macau," Chapman said. "Is that consistent with what you know?"

    "That was acknowledged by other police departments, including the agencies that I worked for, that corruption did exist in portions of the Macau Judicial Police in the 1990s. I couldn't comment on what the current situation is."

    A decision in Lai's case is not expected for several months.

    Quote Quote
    A former Canadian visa officer also testified that police in China claimed Lai contracted hits on three gang rivals — two of which were successful.
    Quote Quote
    Tentacles of groups such as the Lotus Gang, the Big Circle Boys, 14K and Shui-Fung reach into Vancouver and Toronto, he testified.

    "Most of the triads that we have encountered in Canada have an origin in Hong Kong but they operate independently in Canada," Fisher said.

    Lai Tong Sang was involved in a dispute in Macau over control of VIP rooms. he was the head of Water Room or Shui Fong in Macau. they were in conflict with Broken Tooth Koi's 14K.

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    Quote Quote
    Belfast court hears triads 'posted £1m drug money'
    10 April 2013 Last updated at 17:32
     
    A Chinese triad gang may have used the postal system to launder and transfer up to £1m in drugs money, a court has heard.

    The alleged operation involved packages being sent between addresses in London and Belfast.

    Counterfeit Chinese passports and nearly £70,000 in cash were seized during searches at one property in the east of Belfast in March.

    Some of the money had been stuffed into books with the insides removed.

    Wen Zyang, 23, of no fixed address, is charged with possessing criminal property and false identity documents. He is believed to be a highly-trusted member of the organised crime gang behind the racket.

    He also faces two counts of transferring criminal property, namely £60,000 and £30,000 in cash.

    All of the alleged offences occurred between December 2012 and March 2013.

    The court heard how CCTV footage of a Chinese man paying rent on one of the suspected postal drop properties forms part of the police investigation.

    Officers searched a house off the Albertbridge Road and discovered two large parcels posted from London.

    After setting out the suspected triad involvement, a prosecution barrister said Mr Zyang was present and told police the parcels were "only books".

    One package was found to contain a large amount of literature, magazines and an envelope with three counterfeit passports.

    Around £28,000 in cash was discovered inside two hardback books. Nearly £40,000 more was located in a bedroom.


    'Triad nature'

    A judge was told that a 2013 diary with entries in Mandarin was also recovered and translated.

    The barrister said police believe it contained references to drug-dealing and money laundering activity.

    "A number of individuals are named purchasing, and large sums of cash transferred through the postal system," she said.

    "Police believe that approximately £1m from this diary has been paid."

    The court heard that Mr Zyang made a number of admissions during questioning.

    Opposing his release on bail the prosecution lawyer claimed that, based on what police suspect, Mr Zyang was "a highly-trusted member of this organised gang, trusted with large sums of money".

    The defence lawyer said his client, who came to Northern Ireland last year, had confirmed his identity on CCTV footage and cooperated with police.

    He said none of the passports contained Mr Zyang's photo.

    "It does appear that this is going to involve a number of other individuals and other jurisdictions being investigated by other forces," he added.

    Mr Justice Treacy refused bail due to concerns the accused may flee or commit crime.

    "Given the organised and apparently triad nature of the charges and the sheer scale of the illegality that there is in this case, there is a high risk of further offending," he said.

    - A Chinese triad gang may have used the postal system to launder and transfer up to £1m in drugs money, a court has heard.
    - "Given the organised and apparently triad nature of the charges and the sheer scale of the illegality that there is in this case, there is a high risk of further offending," he said.





    Quote Quote
    Bounty of HK$10m still to be collected
    Clifford Lo
    Friday, 05 April, 2013, 4:23am
     
    Rewards amounting to nearly HK$10 million, put up by police as early as 1997, remain on offer with more than 20 culprits still on the run. The police website lists 25 rewards amounting to HK$9.95 million for killers, robbers and acid throwers.

    The highest reward, HK$2.5 million, is being offered for information leading to the arrest of robbers and the recovery of HK$11.7 million in cash and valuables stolen from three safes in the office of Feoso Oil in Cheung Sha Wan last year.

    The stolen property includes dozens of watches, about 200 Canadian maple leaf gold coins and jewellery.

    The second-largest reward, HK$800,000, is for information leading to the arrests of four Wo Shing Wo triad members wanted over the death of Lee Tai-lung, head of the Tsim Sha Tsui faction of the Sun Yee On triad.

    Lee, 41, was rammed by a car outside the Kowloon Shangri-La Hotel in Tsim Sha Tsui in August 2009 before being hacked to death.

    The third biggest reward is H$500,000 for the recovery of a 16.83-carat emerald ring worth HK$12.2 million that vanished in seven minutes after being left in a washroom at the Four Seasons Hotel in Central in September 2011. It is owned by Caroline Scheufele, co-president of the Swiss luxury watch and jewellery company Chopard.

    A reward of HK$300,000, posted on the police website last month, is being offered for information about the killing of a restaurant manager, Kwan Tak-ming, 44, who was shot three times at close range outside his restaurant in Chai Wan in 2001. Despite the offer of a HK$400,000 reward for information about the firebombing of the Top One karaoke lounge in Tsim Sha Tsui in 1997, two suspects - Chan Wai-leung, known as Mei Mei, and Chan Fok-ching, known as Ah Ching - are still being sought. Seventeen people were killed and 13 others injured in the incident.

    Police have also offered four rewards totalling HK$1.2 million for help in solving four acid attacks in Mong Kok and Yau Ma Tei between December 2008 and January 2010 that injured 131 passers-by. No one has been arrested.

    No reward is being offered in connection with the killing of 30-year-old nightclub hostess Wang Rong, whose body was found in a suitcase in Victoria Harbour in April last year. Police are looking for her boyfriend who is believed to have gone to the mainland.

    "We offer cash rewards when we have no clues to the cases," a veteran detective said.

    A police spokesman said "the consideration for offering the rewards, as well as the amount, will depend on the circumstances and suitability of the case".

    Police would not reveal how many rewards had been paid in the past 10 years.


    - The second-largest reward, HK$800,000, is for information leading to the arrests of four Wo Shing Wo triad members wanted over the death of Lee Tai-lung, head of the Tsim Sha Tsui faction of the Sun Yee On triad. Lee, 41, was rammed by a car outside the Kowloon Shangri-La Hotel in Tsim Sha Tsui in August 2009 before being hacked to death.

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    Quote Quote
    Big Circle Boys born of Red Guards: Drugs, loansharking among Asian gang's specialities
    The Big Circle Boys, or Dai Huen Jai, has its origins in the Red Guards, the paramilitary troops of the Chinese Cultural Revolution who terrorized intellectuals and the upper class.
    June 10, 2005


    The Big Circle Boys, or Dai Huen Jai, has its origins in the Red Guards, the paramilitary troops of the Chinese Cultural Revolution who terrorized intellectuals and the upper class.

    After Mao Zedong's death in 1976, many Red Guards were sent to re-education prison camps around the city of Canton -- represented on maps by a big circle, hence the name -- where they were tortured and starved. Having been through this degradation and having military training, they have a fearsome reputation. A number escaped and fled to Hong Kong, where they obtained falsified documents to come to Canada, coming to police attention in 1987 in Vancouver.

    Big Circle Boys are extremely mobile, having a national network in major cities in Canada and the U.S. They are difficult to detect because they work in small cells, which are next to impossible to infiltrate.

    Here are some of the criminal activities associated with Asian organized crime:
     
    DRUG TRAFFICKING

    The mainstay has been heroin from the Golden Triangle of southeast Asia, but in recent years, Asian crime groups have expanded into cocaine and other drugs, including ecstasy and B.C.-grown marijuana.


    LOANSHARKING

    Loan sharks often frequent casinos, where they charge exorbitant interest rates for loans to pay gambling debts. A Toronto loansharking case heard testimony of how first-time loans of $3,000 had to be repaid in three days. Unpaid loans result in violence and drive-by shootings to force repayment.


    HUMAN SMUGGLING/TRAFFICKING

    Many people from southeast Asia agree to pay $45,000 or more to be smuggled into Canada, only to be exploited as prostitutes or forced into labour to pay off their debts. They are also susceptible to robbery from gangs as their lack of immigration papers makes them fearful of reporting crimes against them. Some become drug couriers and others have serious criminal records before coming to Canada.


    COUNTERFEIT CURRENCY AND GOODS

    Asian crime groups are extensively involved in producing, importing and distributing a wide variety of counterfeit goods, including computer software, video/music recordings, brand-name clothing and Canadian-branded tobacco products, according to the 2004 Annual Report on Organized Crime in Canada, published by the criminal intelligence service.

    Advances in computer technology make counterfeit products more difficult to detect. One major concern is the rise of counterfeit prescription drugs, which do not have to comply with health and safety standards. The World Health Organization estimates up to 10 per cent of pharmaceuticals sold globally are counterfeit.

    Last year, money counterfeiting increased by 72 per cent -- more than 138,000 incidents -- making it the sixth-largest crime category in Canada. The surge helped drive Canada's national crime rate up by six per cent last year, the first substantial increase in more than a decade.


    OVERSEAS EXPORT OF STOLEN VEHICLES

    Shipping stolen vehicles overseas is one of the most profitable crimes for Asian organized crime groups because theft rings only need to pay the cost of stealing and shipping -- generally less than 10 per cent of a vehicle's value.

    Stolen vehicles are usually shipped in containers and accompanied by false documentation. Last year in Canada, 171,000 vehicles were stolen -- up five per cent from the previous year, according to a 2004 Statistics Canada report, which estimated about 20 per cent of thefts involved organized crime.




    Quote Quote
    Gang member gunned down
    A man associated with the notorious Big Circle Boys has been gunned down in front of his mansion in Vancouver's Shaughnessy.
    By The Vancouver Province November 5, 2007
    A man associated with the notorious Big Circle Boys has been gunned down in front of his mansion in Vancouver's Shaughnessy.
     
    Vancouver police say Hong Chao "Raymond" Huang was shot numerous times in an apparent targeted murder Saturday night.

    Huang's 10-year-old daughter called 911 to say her dad had been shot. He was dead when police arrived. Numerous shell casings littered the ground.

    Huang, 45, was "well-connected" to the Asian organized gang, a police source told The Province last night.

    "We know the name . . . You would rank him as a Dai Lo [Big Brother] . . . somebody of influence who could organize stuff and make things happen . . . He is quite high up there," said the source.

    The Criminal Intelligence Service of Canada lists the Big Circle Boys as the main Asian organized crime group in B.C., dealing in credit-card fraud, loan sharking, drug smuggling and counterfeit goods and currency.

    "He is known to keep a low profile, driving around in small cars," said the source.

    He said he believes that Huang is on the radar of some Vancouver police and RCMP officers after being linked to "one or two" money seizures involving amounts between $70,000 and $100,000. "I am not sure what has happened to these cases," he said.

    Meanwhile, Vancouver police spokesman Tim Fanning said investigators will start comparing notes with other jurisdictions today.

    "Ultimately, we're looking for a motive," Fanning said.

    "Part of our investigation will be to speak with other police agencies, both in Canada and abroad. We'll certainly check if this is tied to other shootings." Huang was returning home, and police believe the killer or killers either laid in wait or had tailed him.

    "It looks like he was coming home -- he had just parked his car," said Fanning. "He was either followed or they were waiting for him.

    "This is a startling and horrific attack in this neighbourhood." Fanning said Huang was from Asia or Hong Kong.

    It was Vancouver's 18th homicide of the year. Some other shootings have been linked to gang activity.

    Yesterday, residents in the tony neighbourhood were still shaken by the killing.

    "I heard rat-a-tat-a-tat-tat," said Terrie Hashimoto of the shooting at 11:10 p.m. "I thought it was fireworks. Then I heard the sirens, and all the police cars were coming around the corner." Hashimoto said she didn't feel right about the new owners, who paid $3.7 million in 2003 for the mansion in the 3800-block Cartier Street, a huge yellow home on a corner lot with stone walls and security gates and cameras.

    "They have two very large dogs," she said. "The German shepherd scares you to death. It looks like it's going to jump over a six-foot wall to get you." Hashimoto said the latest shooting may be enough for her to move to somewhere safer.

    "I've lived here 35 years -- I don't know my neighbourhood any more," she said. "My husband is getting ready to retire as a physician.

    "I think maybe we should sell the house." Neighbour Huadi Chen was quaking with fear when approached at her front door.

    "Before, I thought Vancouver was a very good city, but now I'm very scared," said Chen. "I thought they were filming a movie, but when the police came I knew it wasn't a movie." Trevor Jones sold the house to what he thought was a nice couple with two young children.

    "I had no idea -- it's amazing," Jones said yesterday. "I did hear a neighbour say that they felt like they were under surveillance.

    "It's five years ago -- she seemed nice, he didn't speak any English.

    "I guess you live by the sword, you die by the sword." The Big Circle Boys were formed by members of the Red Guards, China's paramilitary group. The guards were arrested and sent to labour camps but many escaped and fled to Hong Kong and Chinatowns in North America. The gang is ruthless, working in a network of small cells that span the globe, police say.






    Quote Quote
    Two held over HK$28m money-lending racket
    Clifford Lo
    Saturday, 06 April, 2013, 3:05am

    Police have arrested two people they suspect were key players in a loan and money laundering racket that handled more than HK$28 million over the past five years.

     
    One of the suspects - a 34-year-old man - is believed to be the mastermind of the syndicate which was active in the Kowloon West region. The alleged Wo Shing Wo triad member was picked up when anti-triad officers raided his home in Sau Mau Ping Estate at about 6am.

    The other suspect - a 41-year-old woman - was nabbed at her flat at Hiu Lai Court in Hiu Kwong Street, Sau Mau Ping, at daybreak. She was accused of allowing the syndicate to use her bank accounts to collect repayments from debtors and launder money, according to police.

    Police are still looking for more than 10 people whose bank accounts may have also been involved in money laundering, along with three or four other key figures of the syndicate.

    "An initial investigation shows the total amount of money laundered through their accounts involved more than HK$28 million," an officer said.

    Police believe 300 to 400 people had borrowed money from the syndicate since 2008 as they were unable to get loans from licensed money-lenders. The syndicate advertised their business in newspapers and on street posters.

    Sham Shui Po police began an investigation after a debtor was bundled into a car in Yu Chau Street, Sham Shui Po, driven to Kowloon Peak, known as Fei Ngo Shan, in October and beaten severely. Officers rescued the man and arrested three people. Inside the car were accounting records that led them to key figures of the syndicate.

    Last night the two suspects were being held for questioning and no charge had been laid.


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